Book : Cell Biology
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Posted by: CHELSEA
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Cell Adhesion

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Cell adhesion is the process by which cells interact and attach to a surface, substrate or another cell, mediated by interactions between molecules of the cell surface. Cell adhesion occurs from the action of transmembrane glycoproteins, called cell adhesion molecules. Examples of these proteins include selectins, integrins, syndecans, and cadherins. Cellular adhesion is essential in maintaining multicellular structure. Cellular adhesion can link cells in different ways and can be involved in signal transduction. Cell adhesion is also essential for the pathogenesis of infectious organisms. To form an anchoring junction, cells must first adhere. A bulky cytoskeletal apparatus must then be assembled around the molecules that directly mediate the adhesion. The result is a well-defined structure—a desmosome, a hemidesmosome, a focal adhesion, or an adherens junction—that is easily identified in the electron microscope. 

Indeed, electron microscopy provided the basis for the original classification of cell junctions. In the early stages of cell junctiondevelopment, however, before the cytoskeletal apparatus has assembled, cells often adhere to one another without clearly displaying these characteristic structures; in the electron microscope, one may simply see two plasma membranes separated by a small gap of a definite width. Functional tests show, nevertheless, that the two cells are stuck to each other, and biochemical analysis can reveal the molecules responsible for the adhesion.

Cells interact with each other, and their substrate, throughout their lifetime. These interactions can be transient, such as at the immunological synapse, or they can be long-lived, such as at a neuromuscular junction. These complex cellular structures involve many proteins; from receptor molecules to structural scaffolding proteins. Significant differences in composition exist between an adhesion complex that interacts with the cellular substrate, or extracellular matrix, and one that interacts with another cell. Despite the differences however their fundamental function remains the same; to enable cellular communication through the generation and transduction of mechanical signals. While cell-cell adhesions serve as cellular ‘handshakes’, cell-matrix adhesions allow a cell to pull against its substrate to either measure the substrate rigidity, or to pull the cell forward.

Cell adhesions can be described as a functional extension of the actin cytoskeleton. Indeed, all adhesion types are linked physically to the actin filament network, and the dynamic processes of actin filament polymerization and disassembly are intertwined with the turnover and function of the adhesions complexes. Cell adhesions are mediated by either transmembrane cell-adhesion molecules (CAMs), which binding similar partner proteins on opposing cells, or adhesion receptors, which bind various ligands. These proteins are integral to the formation of adhesions and essentially link the intracellular space to the extracellular space to help relay information to the cell interior about the surroundings.

Eukaryotes

Protozoans express multiple adhesion molecules. An example of a pathogenic protozoan is the malarial parasite (Plasmodium falciparum), which uses one adhesion molecule called the circumsporozoite protein to bind to liver cells, and another adhesion molecule called the merozoite surface protein to bind red blood cells.

Mammalian cells express many different types of adhesion molecules. The major classes are named integrins, Ig superfamily members, cadherins, and selectins. Each of these adhesion molecules has a different function and recognizes different ligands. Defects in cell adhesion are usually attributable to defects in expression of adhesion molecules.

Cell-cell adhesions in Anchoring junctions are mediated by cadherins. The cadherin subunit, β-catenin plays a role in cell-cell adhesion by controlling cadherin-mediated cell adhesion at the plasma membrane. Cell–matrix adhesions however, are usually mediated by integrins.

Selective cell–cell adhesion enables vertebrate cells to assemble into organised tissues. homophilic attachment allows selective recognition resulting. Cells of a similar type stick together whereas cells of a different type stay segregated.

Human genetic diseases

There are human genetic diseases caused by an inability to express a specific adhesion molecule. An example is leukocyte adhesion deficiency-I (LAD-I), where patients do not express the β2-integrin subunit precursor. This integrin is required for leukocytes to adhere to the blood vessel wall during inflammation in order to fight infection. The leukocytes from LAD-I patients fail to adhere and patients exhibit serious episodes of infection that can be life-threatening.

Tumor adhesion

Cancer metastasis tumors that spread through the circulatory system use mechanisms of cell adhesion to establish new tumors in the body. Release of epoxyeicosatrienoic acid is believed to increase this propensity.

Prokaryotes

Prokaryotes have adhesion molecules usually termed "adhesins". Adhesins may occur on pili (fimbriae), flagella, or the cell surface. Adhesion of bacteria is the first step in colonization and regulates tropism (tissue- or cell-specific interactions).

Viruses

Viruses also have adhesion molecules required for viral binding to host cells. For example, influenza virus has a hemagglutinin on its surface that is required for recognition of the sugar sialic acid on host cell surface molecules. HIV has an adhesion molecule termed gp120 that binds to its ligand CD4, which is expressed on lymphocytes.



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