Book : Cell Biology
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Posted by: CHELSEA
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Writer CHELSEA

Cell Cycle

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The most basic function of the cell cycle is to duplicate accurately the vast amount of DNA in the chromosomes and then segregate the copies precisely into two genetically identical daughter cells. These processes define the two major phases of the cell cycle. DNA duplication occurs during S phase (S for synthesis), which requires 10–12 hours and occupies about half of the cell-cycle time in a typical mammalian cell. After S phase, chromosome segregation and cell division occur in M phase (M for mitosis), which requires much less time (less than an hour in a mammalian cell). M phase involves a series of dramatic events that begin with nuclear division, or mitosis. As discussed in detail in Chapter 18, mitosis begins with chromosome condensation: the duplicated DNA strands, packaged into elongated chromosomes, condense into the much more compact chromosomes required for their segregation. The nuclear envelope then breaks down, and the replicated chromosomes, each consisting of a pair of sister chromatids, become attached to the microtubules of the mitotic spindle. As mitosis proceeds, the cell pauses briefly in a state called metaphase, when the chromosomes are aligned at the equator of the mitotic spindle, poised for segregation. The sudden separation of sister chromatids marks the beginning of anaphase, during which the chromosomes move to opposite poles of the spindle, where they decondense and reform intact nuclei. 

Stages of the cell cycle:

To divide, a cell must complete several important tasks: it must grow, copy its genetic material (DNA), and physically split into two daughter cells. Cells perform these tasks in an organized, predictable series of steps that make up the cell cycle. The cell cycle is a cycle, rather than a linear pathway, because at the end of each o-round, the two daughter cells can start the exact same process over again from the beginning. In eukaryotic cells, or cells with a nucleus, the stages of the cell cycle are divided into two major phases: interphase and the mitotic (M) phase.

  • - During interphase, the cell grows and makes a copy of its DNA.
  • - During the mitotic (M) phase, the cell separates its DNA into two sets and divides its cytoplasm, forming two new cells.

Interphase: 

Let’s enter the cell cycle just as a cell forms, by division of its mother cell. What must this newborn cell do next if it wants to go on and divide itself? Preparation for division happens in three steps:

  • - G1 phase: During G1 phase, also called the first gap phase, the cell grows physically larger, copies organelles, and makes the molecular building blocks it will need in later steps.
  • - S phase: In S phase, the cell synthesizes a complete copy of the DNA in its nucleus. It also duplicates a microtubule-organizing structure called the centrosome. The centrosomes help separate DNA during M phase.
  • - G​2 phase: During the second gap phase, or G2​​ phase, the cell grows more, makes proteins and organelles, and begins to reorganize its contents in preparation for mitosis. G​2​​ phase ends when mitosis begins.

The G1, S, and G2 phases together are known as interphase. The prefix inters- means between, reflecting that interphase takes place between one mitotic (M) phase and the next.

M phase:

During the mitotic (M) phase, the cell divides its copied DNA and cytoplasm to make two new cells. M phase involves two distinct division-related processes: mitosis and cytokinesis.

In mitosis, the nuclear DNA of the cell condenses into visible chromosomes and is pulled apart by the mitotic spindle, a specialized structure made out of microtubules. Mitosis takes place in four stages: prophase (sometimes divided into early prophase and prometaphase), metaphase, anaphase, and telophase. You can learn more about these stages in the video on mitosis.

In cytokinesis, the cytoplasm of the cell is split in two, making two new cells. Cytokinesis usually begins just as mitosis is ending, with a little overlap. Importantly, cytokinesis takes place differently in animal and plant cells.



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